Aabroo Educational Welfare Organization: Good Seed Makes a Good Crop

Aabroo Educational Welfare Organization: Good Seed Makes a Good Crop

Robina Shakeel, a non-governmental Aabroo Educational Welfare Organization, has always been a pioneer in opening temporary schools, operating temporary schools with funds generated from the collection and sale of waste every day.

Women Behind Aabroo, Rubina Shakeel
Women Behind Aabroo, Rubina Shakeel

Lahore has a population of more than 11 million and produces 7,200 tons of waste every day. While the Lahore Waste Management Company (LWMC) has only one company, which is responsible for handling a pile of garbage. In this case, a non-governmental organization, Aabroo Education Welfare, took the lead in managing a batch of temporary schools with funds generated from daily waste collection and sales.

A Woman In Lahore Sells Garbage To Educate Thousands Of Children: AabrooEducational Welfare Organization

Founded by Robina Shakeel, a charity activist based in Lahore, Abreu (translated as respect) provides education, food and medicine to more than 5,000 poor children and orphans studying in these schools.

The organization collected 21 tons of waste from 8,000 households across the city and sorted out plastic bottles and reusable materials from the garbage. The collected items are then sold to the local recycling market. Which generates 1.72 million rupees (approximately) rupees per month, enough to cover 40% of the school’s expenses.

Aabroo currently owns three secondary schools in Aabroo Welfare, providing day and evening courses for 1,532 children, including a secondary school on Ata Bakhsh Road. Its headquarters are located in Hudiara Drain, the city’s largest open-air sewer.

A Woman In Lahore Sells Garbage To Educate Thousands Of Children: Aabroo Educational Welfare Organization
A Woman In Lahore Sells Garbage To Educate Thousands Of Children: Aabroo Educational Welfare Organization

Children enrolled in these schools from kindergarten to intermediate level not only receive free education and vocational training. But also receive medical assistance, lunchtime fresh food, books, stationery, uniforms and toys.

Currently, more than 300 girls are receiving sewing and knitting training from coaches in three different facilities. The staff includes 150 lecturers, 45 administrative staff and more than 50 volunteers.

Aabroo Welfare Where Waste Make Good

Robina told TNS that he came from a poor background. “Some elderly people nearby and my little siblings helped me continue my studies. When I felt that I could help disadvantaged children, I had the same idea.”

She said she started teaching the five children of the maid “on the balcony of our car”. This number has increased over time: “In about 40 days, my number of students has increased to 65!”

Robina said she realized that the free lunch and free education in the afternoon would attract parents of children. This laid the foundation for Aabroo Educational Care in 2003.

The organization collected 21 tons of waste from 8,000 households across the city and sorted out plastic bottles and reusable materials from the garbage. Then sell the collected items to the local recycling market.

Today, every school’s kitchen prepares food for students. These schools also have cattle farms to provide milk for the children.

In addition, students will also receive technical and vocational training (TVT). He added that it is mandatory. “Children can choose from a variety of fields, including sewing, designing clothes, repairing and maintaining electronics, cooking or calling center work.”

Shakeel firmly believes that students should receive technical education. He said: “It is this skill that makes them productive citizens in society after they leave school.”

A large garbage collection station was established near the Aabroo headquarters. These bags were distributed to about 8,000 households to store solid waste. After that, the Aabroo team collected them and brought them to the warehouse.

“In the warehouse, our team sort wood, clothes, books and decorations,” said Zahid Qureshi, warehouse manager in Aabroo. “We send all kinds of plastics, bottles, glass, kitchenware, electronic products and paper to recycling companies registered with the Punjab government.”

Aabroo Welfare Details

The bundled clothes are used to sew eco-friendly shopping bags that can be sold in the market. None of our waste is our waste, everything can be reused to educate, feed and provide shelter for children in need, and this makes us proud. “

Environmental scientist Asif Ali Sayal believes that the collection and use of residential waste is a good example.

Rubina-Khalid
Rubina-Khalid: Founder of Aabroo

He said: “LWMC’s daily garbage collection capacity may not exceed 6,000 tons, so the remaining garbage provides opportunities for the informal sector.”

It is estimated that this informal economy is worth more than Rs 1 billion per year. Aabroo needs to raise 3.7 million rupees a month to cover operating costs.

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